Srinivasa Ramanujan

I was very pleased on reading this news that Government of India has decided to celebrate the upcoming year 2012 as the National Mathematical Year. This is 125th birth anniversary of math-wizard Srinivasa Ramanujan (1887-1920). He is one of the greatest mathematicians India ever produced. Well this is ‘not’ the main reason for appointing 2012 as National Mathematical Year as it is only a tribute to him. Main reason is the emptiness of mathematical awareness in Indian Students. First of all there are only a few graduating with Mathematics and second, many not choosing mathematics as a primary subject at primary levels. As mathematics is not a very earning stream, most students want to go for professional courses such as Engineering, Medicine, Business and Management. Remaining graduates who enjoy science, skip through either physical or chemical sciences. Engineering craze has developed the field of Computer Science but not so much in theoretical Computer Science, which is one of the most recommended branches in mathematics. Statistics and Combinatorics are almost ‘died’ in many of Indian Universities and Colleges. No one wants to deal with those brain cracking math-problems: neither students nor professors. Institutes where mathematics is being taught are struggling with the lack of talented lecturers. Talented mathematicians don’t want to teach here since they aren’t getting much money and ordinary lecturers can’t do much more. India is almost ‘zero’ in Mathematics and some people including critics still roar that we discovered ‘zero’, ‘pi’ and we had Ramanujan.

 

Mathematics

Indian education divided into three categories: —-Primary, Secondary and Higher Education, looks like a mountain climbing after a smooth beginning.

In primary classes, a student is taught about elementary topics (like Elementary Operations, Introductory Algebra and Geometry in Mathematics). Primary classes take about 8 to 10 years. When promoted to Secondary Classes, which are of 4 years exactly, students are distributed among two categories: one studying science subjects (Math, Physics, Chem, Bio etc.) and others not studying science subjects (History, Politics etc.). Only 2 out of 10 students opt for Mathematics. Reason? The students are introduced to some very complicated topics, which are unexpected as primary education doesn’t prepare them well to tackle these. Mathematics suddenly becomes extremely tough to handle and the mathematician dies within him/her. The total eliminators of mathematics are IIT-JEE and AIEEE type exams. These lead students to study in a fast forward way and they start their chase to marks, money and machines. Students who succeed in these exams, go for engineering in premier IITs and NITs while others pursue so with private institutes. And here starts the higher education. Out of 10 students passed with Math as subject in secondary classes, 3 students choose to pursue under-graduation with mathematics. There are two ways to pursue under-graduation with Math. First is doing honours course in mathematics and second is regular bachelor’s degree of math with two other science subjects like Physics or Psychology or Geography or Economics. This also divides the mathematical interest. And believe me, 90% of these math-undergrads are those who tried for engineering exams but could never succeed. They have no heart with math. They are trained to write in exams. Only 2% of undergrads go for graduation with mathematics. IITs and NITs also operate graduate courses in mathematical sciences, but there are only a few which go for it.

Well, I am not a good writer (actually I am very weak in English) and not any keen to discuss around modern Indian education system. I am just extremely delighted for now and expect next year will write new chapters in Indian and World Mathematics. I will be blogging on Mathematics in National Mathematical Year 2012 even more frequently.

MY DIGITAL NOTEBOOK in 2012-2013:.

  • More articles on Mathematical Developments (specially in India).
  • More Puzzles and Problems.
  • A New Google Group and Facebook Page (announcement soon).
  • Co-authors
  • Some Guest Articles from renowned mathematicians.
  • All posts of ‘A Trip to Mathematics’ will be written from scratch.
  • New Series on ‘Biographies of Mathematicians’
  • More e-books. More study notes.

And more.

Wishing you a Very Happy New Year (an early package 🙂 )!

                                                       

Published by Gaurav Tiwari

A designer by profession, a mathematician by education but a Blogger by hobby. Loves reading and writing. Just that.

21 Comments

  1. I agree with your thoughts… in a way Engineering revolution has affected the “intellect” of India. It produces 100s of 1000s mediocre engineers every year … which are directly absorbed into IT industry… The core engineering is lost so is core Mathematics and Physics. In modern world, mathematics specially applied mathematics dealing with linear algebra is playing a crucial part. Modern computational power is highly dependent on statistical analysis.

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  2. True. I have been researching and reading Advanced Mathematics as well as Higher Physics for 2 years and haven’t seen enough progress from Indian researchers, except few like Srinivasa Rao and other NRI’s.

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    • Gaurav…
      Seeing your keen interest in mathematics I would suggest you to major in Mathematics and do a PHD. There are lots of Masters and PHD opportunity in fields related to statistical analysis here in Europe. Though I opted for a job instead of a PHD in numerical transmission systems (for personal reasons), I would love to see Indian PHDs in this field. All the best.

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  3. Gaurav, I know your love for mathematics, and happy that Government of India has taken some steps to create awareness! As far as I am concerned, I know 100s of engineering students personally and have seen only one individual doing postgraduation in Maths, so it’s really concerning!

    Well, looking ahead for your research blog 🙂

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    • Out of those 100s, 90 must be applied engineers. 🙂 Thanks for your comment Ganesh. I know I’m very bad in planning but still there is hope within me that I can start some serious stuffs in April-May.

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  4. A VERY GOOD INITIATIVE FROM THE GOVT OF INDIA. STUDENT COMMUNITY WILL DEFINITELY BENEFIT FROM THIS PROGRAMME. MAY ALL PUPIL TAKE MORE INTERST TO ENHANCE THEIR MATHEMATICAL SCIENCE. CONGRATULATIONS. PROF.M.ABUBAKER, PRINCIPAL, SCHOLARS INDIAN SCHOOL, RAK UAE.

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  5. thats nice
    government support on education through great program “national Mathematics”

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  6. dear Gaurav,
    YOU HAVE GREAT FUTURE IN MATHEMATICS. YOUR THOUGHTS ARE LIKE A EXPERIENCED PERSONS THOUGHTS.OK KEEP IT UP AND MAKE MANY IDEAS HOW TO BECOME USEFUL THIS MATHEMATICS YEAR TO STUDENTS.OK KEEP IT UP.

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  7. its realy proud feeling for us to celebrate national mathematical year as a tribute to shrinivas ramanujan, so lets bring some changes in littie minds of mathematicians .

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  8. national maths year rocks

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  9. Gaurav,
    M doing my PG in pure maths, could u suggest if it is good to do a direct PhD??

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  10. Gaurav, excellent piece ~ do you know if there is an online digitized version of Ramanujan’s notebooks, in his original handwriting?

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  11. MR. GAURAV. ON THE BASIS OF ABOVE COMMENTS YOUR DREAM IS ABOVE THE SKY AND WISH U ALL THE BEST . GOD HELP U

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  12. 🙂

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  13. i am waiting for this great event

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  14. thanks brother it’s great………..

    Reply

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