Before my college days I used to multiply this way.

But as time passed, I learned new things. In a Hindi magazine named “Bhaskar Lakshya”, I read an article in which a columnist ( I can’t remember his name) suggested how to multiply in single line (row). That was a magic to me.  I found doing multiplications this way, very faster – easier and smarter. There may be many who already know this method, but many others will be seeing it for the first time.

The ‘only’ requirements for using this method is the quick summation. You should be good in your calculations. Smarter your calculations, faster you’re.
I’ll try to illustrate this method below. If you had any problems regarding language (it’s poor off-course) and understandings, please feel free to put that into comments.

Let we try to multiply 498 with 753.
$ 4 9 8 \ \times 7 5 3$

Step I

Multiply 8 and 3 and write the unit digit of result carrying other digits for next step. The same is to be done with each step.

Step 2

Step 3

Step 4

Step 5

The overall work looks like:

I don’t know if there is any algorithm behind it. The pattern of calculation is very simple, which is making crosses and adding numbers.

 

You can use this method, multiplying larger numbers too. Try this one at your own. Steps are marked for convenience. 🙂

Thanks for Reading!

Total
0
Shares


Feel free to ask questions, send feedback and even point out mistakes. Great conversations start with just a single word. How to write better comments?
4 comments
  1. Hi Gaurav, I use this method as my primary method for multiplication, it really easy and works well. I never thought about the algorithm, but now as you noted there must be one, I just wrote it down. Here is it: Note that AB actually means 10a+b. e.gs.89=10×8+9
    (10x+y)(10a+b)
    =100ax+10bx+10ay+by
    =100ax+10(ay+bx)+by
    This is for multiplication of 2-digit number by 2-digit numbers; this can be proved for any number for that matter. This is precisely what we do!
    X Y
    x A B
    —————————
    AX (AY+BX) BY
    I don’t know who to do mathematical formatting in blogs, but I guess you will get it!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

You May Also Like

Three Children, Two Friends and One Mathematical Puzzle

Two close friends, Robert and Thomas, met again after a gap of several years. Robert Said: I am now married and have three children. Thomas Said: That’s great! How old they are? Robert: Thomas! Guess it yourself with some clues provided by me. The product of the ages of my children is 36. Thomas: Hmm… Not so helpful clue. Can…

Getting Started with Measure Theory

Last year, I managed to successfully finish Metric Spaces, Basic Topology and other Analysis topics. Starting from the next semester I’ll be learning more pure mathematical topics, like Functional Analysis, Combinatorics and more. The plan is to lead myself to Combinatorics by majoring Functional Analysis and Topology. But before all those, I’ll be studying measure theory and probability this July – August. Probability…

Meet the Math Blogger : Josh Young from Mathematical Mischief

Every mathematics student is in his own a special case — having his own qualities and snags. A math blogger is even more special.  He is more than just a mathematician or just a blogger. A math blogger is an entertainer… a magician, who devises techniques of making math more readable and even more interesting. There are hundreds of such…

How Many Fishes in One Year? [A Puzzle in Making]

This is a puzzle which I told to my classmates during a talk, a few days before. I did not represent it as a puzzle, but a talk suggesting the importance of Math in general life. This is partially solved for me and I hope you will run your brain-horse to help me solve it completely. If you didn’t notice,…
mobile number is prime number
Read More

My mobile number is a prime number

My personal mobile number 9565804301 is a prime number. What is a prime number?$ Any integer p greater than 1 is called a prime number if and only if its positive factors are 1 and the number p itself. In other words, the natural numbers which are completely divisible by 1 and themselves only and have no other factors, are called prime numbers. 2$ ,$ 3$…