Month: February 2011

2005081500220201

Solving Ramanujan’s Puzzling Problem

Consider a sequence of functions as follows:- $ f_1 (x) = \sqrt {1+\sqrt {x} } $ $ f_2 (x) = \sqrt{1+ \sqrt {1+2 \sqrt {x} } } $ $ f_3 (x) = \sqrt {1+ \sqrt {1+2 \sqrt {1+3 \sqrt {x} } } } $ ……and so on to $ f_n (x) = \sqrt {1+\sqrt{1+2 \sqrt {1+3 \sqrt {\ldots \sqrt {1+n \sqrt {x} } } } } } $

Raman Effect- Raman Spectroscopy- Raman Scattering

In contrast to other conventional branches of spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy deals with the scattering of light & not with its absorption. Raman Effect Chandrasekhar Venkat Raman discovered in 1928 that if light of a definite frequency is passed through any substance in gaseous, liquid or solid state, the light scattered at right angles contains radiations not only of the original frequency (Rayleigh Scattering)  but also of some other frequencies which are generally lower but occasionally higher than the frequency of the incident light. The phenomenon of scattering of light by a substance when the frequencies of radiations scattered at right angles are different (generally lower and only occasionally higher) from the frequency of the incident light, is known as Raman Scattering or Raman effect. The lines of lower frequencies as known as Stokes lines while those of higher frequencies are called anti-stokes lines. If $f$  is the frequency of the incident light &  $f’$  that of a particular line in the scattered spectrum, then the difference   $f-f’$  is known as the Raman Frequency. This frequency is independent of the frequency of the incident light. It is constant and is characteristic of …